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Biggest fallacies in training today?

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  • Biggest fallacies in training today?

    Hi everyone, with the explosion of available training available to the general public what is the biggest issue or fallacy that we members of the public should watch out for? I mean there's a lot of info floating around now and now and what works on the flat range may not work in real life. What are your pet peeves that you see and tell tale signs that make you go "yeah, that person has no real life experience". Thanks for your responses.

  • #2
    Great question. I think our SMEs can provide some valuable insights.

    This is another big reason why Tactical Hyve was created (the other reason being to bridge the gap from marksmanship to practical gunfighting--for the lack of a better phrase.)

    Similar to combatives and knife fighting, there are a lot of people who teach how to defend themselves, but many have not been in an actual fight. This doesn't necessarily mean that these people do not know what they are talking about, because they may teach what they've learned from instructors who, in contrast, have 'real-life' experience. Some of these instructors may hold true to what they were taught, while others will teaching variations, add their own techniques, etc. (The game telephone comes to mind here.)

    However, and this is just me, I'd rather learn directly from people who have been in real gunfights to ensure what I'm learning is authentic. Not having been in a gunfight myself, if I learned from someone who was never in a gunfight but who learned from someone who has been, I still wouldn't really know if what I was being taught was true.

    Looking forward to hearing what the SMEs have to say.

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    • #3
      Anybody can teach marksmanship if they've got some training, not everybody can or should teach the mindset involved with being in a gunfight.

      If I'm a rocket scientist, does that qualify me to teach people how it feels to float in space?

      No. I can only tell you how to build a rocket. Talk to an astronaut if you want to know about that

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Angry Smurf View Post
        Hi everyone, with the explosion of available training available to the general public what is the biggest issue or fallacy that we members of the public should watch out for? I mean there's a lot of info floating around now and now and what works on the flat range may not work in real life. What are your pet peeves that you see and tell tale signs that make you go "yeah, that person has no real life experience". Thanks for your responses.
        This is a great question (I assume your asking about self defense training) i'd say the biggest is mindset. training a fighters mindset is the hardest thing to do, with stressful events there is one of three responses the typical person will experience fight, flight or freeze, not everyone is capable of fighting when these events happen. that's why its important to train as often as possible. shooting a gun is easy, to think after you take one class your going to be a expert marksmen is kinda ridiculous but there is certain things that don't change no matter who teaches you, the big three are sights, trigger and grip.Things to watch out for if taking a self defense class: when mindset is not mentioned and the explanation of the reality of the situation is not presented up front (live by the sword you're going to get cut), if you spend most of the time in a concealed carry class and your shooting bullseyes at 25m that should raise some red flags. when taking a self defense class you should becoming familiar with the equipment you are using, marksmanship is definitely a part of it but its important to be learning and training techniques to decrease the time it takes for you to get that first round on target if that makes since. pet peeve of mine: I hate when a range is ran so strict that people are afraid of handling their own firearms, I understand why, but I have ran thousands of live fire ranges and shoot houses without incident (knock on wood), to become proficient with a firearm you need to feel comfortable and not have to worry about getting kicked off the range or whatever. one can still run a range with out treating people like children but at the end of the day it comes down to time, place, event. A few of the SMEs on the site offer classes with rifle and pistol, a lot of the time they will do one on one training if you want to feel comfortable or tired of being treated like a child at the range I recommend hooking up with one of them.











        1: type of training, there is many styles of shooting for example competition that breaks down into sub categories Bullseye, IDPA, USPA, NRL etc. Self defense, Home defense, concealed carry etc.
        My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

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        • #5
          Like Billy said, mindset is key. I would also say if the course is trying to pack to much into to little time (rifle, pistol, shotgun, CQB, and TCCC in one day?). The course should be focused, use crawl, walk, run technique, learn and train slowly, then use timed events to cause stress and show you what you don't own yet. Avoid "classes" where the instructor just shows off how fast he is and claims he has the secret technique that will make you instantly deadly.........
          My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

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          • #6
            my biggest pet peeve is every single instagram instructor has to separate himself by some "new" technique. After 15 plus years of active warfare, you would think there would be some pretty ironed out techniques, tactics and procedures to teach and there is. The guys who are teaching it won't be the guys who are 26 and ex-ninja unit six, extra medium t-shirts and doing power cleans into a el prez. This is because with 3-4 years of service they were barely done being a new guy much less being a tactical expert able to teach anyone anything. The problem is when we start to assign instagram follower count as validity to information. Someone's ability to choreograph and video drills does not translate into tactical relevancy or actual experience. Someone who is fast, cannot necessarily teach you to be fast. There is a lot to learn about the fundamentals from the competition guys and they should stay away from teaching tactics. The tactical guys need to stop downplaying the competition guys because 90 percent of they time they are probably faster than the "tactical expert". The best instructor is the perpetual student and the best instructors I know take classes throughout the year from other people to see what else is out there. They shoot competitions to stay current and stay in touch with their prior units to see what is being done on duty. Some guys view learning as something that will somehow invalidate them, when it does quite the opposite.
            Last edited by BruiserInd; 06-11-2019, 05:03 PM.

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