Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Do You Do The Sidestep?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Do You Do The Sidestep?

    Hello! Got a question for ya all:

    I’d like to know what other pistoleros think about the infrequently seen pistol gunfighting technique of taking a ‘step to the left’ on the draw as you begin to engage an aggressive (and right-handed) pistol combatant?

    The way I’ve been told this technique works is to take, ‘a short step to the left when drawing against a right-handed attacker, and a short step to the right when drawing against a left-handed attacker’. I also understand that, IF a protective vest isn’t being worn, then it’s acceptable to step into a ‘bladed’ (or ‘3/4’) turn away from the other gunman.

    Supposedly this method of sidestepping on the draw is valid because of the human mind’s ultimate penchant to aim, instinctively, off of the body’s vertical centerline axis.

    Yes, I’ve got my own strong opinion(s) on this question; but, sometimes, opinions can be wrong; and, other than my own martial arts experience, I have no empirical evidence, or other scientific validation for using this technique. So, I thought I’d ask around and see what kind of additional information might turn up? (Maybe something new that I haven’t seen before.) Thanks, I look forward to reading any and all replies!
    ‘L‘Enfer C’est Les Autres, Et Les Choses Terribles Qu’ils Font!’

  • #2
    Originally posted by Arc Angel View Post
    Hello! Got a question for ya all:

    I’d like to know what other pistoleros think about the infrequently seen pistol gunfighting technique of taking a ‘step to the left’ on the draw as you begin to engage an aggressive (and right-handed) pistol combatant?

    The way I’ve been told this technique works is to take, ‘a short step to the left when drawing against a right-handed attacker, and a short step to the right when drawing against a left-handed attacker’. I also understand that, IF a protective vest isn’t being worn, then it’s acceptable to step into a ‘bladed’ (or ‘3/4’) turn away from the other gunman.

    Supposedly this method of sidestepping on the draw is valid because of the human mind’s ultimate penchant to aim, instinctively, off of the body’s vertical centerline axis.

    Yes, I’ve got my own strong opinion(s) on this question; but, sometimes, opinions can be wrong; and, other than my own martial arts experience, I have no empirical evidence, or other scientific validation for using this technique. So, I thought I’d ask around and see what kind of additional information might turn up? (Maybe something new that I haven’t seen before.) Thanks, I look forward to reading any and all replies!
    I'll take a shot at this one (pun intended)... Our pistol qualification recently changed incorporating "stepping off the tracks" at closer distances. It was incorporated to get officers moving instead of training on a line doing standard drills, with the mindset of buying a split second to get rounds down range and not make yourself an easy target. I haven't heard of moving to one side or the other based on the dominate side of the subject, with my experience that's going to be the last thing going through your mind if you're going to engage a threat. My advice to you is keep it simple shoot, move, communicate and train often, even if its dry fire drawing working from the holster and get your feet moving. A few of the SMEs on this site offer a tactical pistol course, worth the investment and nobody can take that knowledge away, think about how long you practiced martial arts before you became proficient, same thing when you put that pistol/tool in your hand.
    My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would be more worried of just moving. Reactions are always slower then action compounded by trying to decide which way too move is too much for my brain.

      Comment


      • #4
        Taking a step during the holster draw conditions your muscle memory to move your legs during a reaction to threat scenario. If you spend all your time at the range with your feet planted whiles drawing and shooting then your going to do it in real life. It all goes back to train how you fight. Make sure you are shuffle stepping not crossing your feet. One step is enough just practice both directions. As far as which direction to go, I say the one that gets me closer to cover or farther from them. Distance and cover are your friends. Now All blading off is going to do is get you shot in both lungs vs the one etc. hope this helps.

        -THC
        Last edited by Tac Hyve Cadre; 06-11-2019, 08:45 PM.
        My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

        Comment


        • #5
          We teach the draw standing still, its easier to learn and with 30 guys on line its safer that way. Once they have got it, during the second week of training we teach transition from primary to secondary , moving and shooting and more. Transitioning on the move requires drawing while side stepping, moving forward and back (1:1 instructor to student ratio) we never specifically teach to always side step during a draw, that may not be the right move to make in a critical situation.
          My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hello, Arc Angel! I’ll add a few words to this topic.

            First, the side stepping you see in training videos are typically there as a mechanism to practice moving while drawing, get off the X, or establish just become a mobile target. Due to large student courses or range constraints you typically only see one step either side. It’s canned training, and in my opinion mindless. A better way of doing it is to continue the dynamic movement while during your engagement or actually move to a real piece of cover that was placed somewhere in the range. Of course, this is more individualized training that cannot be done with a line of shooters. Large ratio courses are more of a seminar, and can be great sources of learning, but are limited. Finding a place to open it up is really your best bet to increasing your proficiency.

            Second, I have heard of study about some of the common movements made by people depending on their hand or possibly eye dominance, or both. I’m not an expert in it, but when given the choice, right handed will typically move right and shoot around the right side of a barricade. Left goes left. There is actually some data I’ve heard about that is race dependent. Very interesting stuff! I haven’t studied this enough, but where you can test yourself is with force-on-force non-lethal munitions exercises.
            My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

            Comment


            • #7
              Another good reply FR, thank you!

              I would suggest that the direction in which a sidestep is taken should also be considered. For instance I'm aware that a right-handed draw and attack can be thrown (by varying degree) off-target through forcing an attacking shooter to have to make a last moment adjustment and move his muzzle toward the outside of his body (usually toward the right) where it is more difficult for him to have to index the shot off of his body's vertical axis, or centerline.

              As for 'blading' on a sidestep? We're not talking about taking a dueling stance. (Where did that come from?) We're talking about 'fading' the (usually) right shoulder on the sidestep. As for time? Time increases with distance. When it's really up close 'n personal I'll agree that there is little or no time in which to act; but, if you're able to engage (or 'reply') at both a longer and more functional distance (like, say, 7 to 12 yards) then it's much easier to see whatever impending action an opponent is 'telegraphing', and you'll have more time to act rather than being forced to react—Which is never a good thing to have happen; but, still, life isn't perfect and, sometimes, bad things can happen to 'good' (otherwise skillful and well-trained) people.
              ‘L‘Enfer C’est Les Autres, Et Les Choses Terribles Qu’ils Font!’

              Comment

              Working...
              X