Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Split times between shots

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Split times between shots

    I understand that the average self defense encounter avg like 3.8 shots or something, but for training purposes what in everyone’s opinion is a more realistic split time for real world encounters? Competition shooters strive for the shortest, accurate splits which the top shooters can achieve at around .25 seconds. They are however shooting at a competition with a back drop, a safe direction, with no real worry of hitting anyone.

  • #2
    A 'top pistol shooter' should be able to fire off an accurate split in .10 to .12 second @ 10 yards. (Believe it, or not there ARE faster accurate split shooters out there!) This question imagines that such fast splits are neither aimed, nor accurate shots when, in fact, such fast splits can be easily delivered into the -0, -1 IDPA target zones. Non sequiturs like: 'backstops', or 'safe directions', or 'worrying' about where your shots are going are all prime examples of a LIFE-THREATENING LACK of 'target focus' on the shooter's part. If you've got to fire then you've got to fire—It's that simple.

    If you're able to see it coming (and hopefully you will) then you can do things like: move for position, and/or angle the shot, but that's about it. Your mental focus has to be on exactly that spot where you want to place your first double, or triple tap. (Because, out in the real world, there is rarely any such thing as a 'one shot stops all' magic bullet.) In order to be able to work effectively 'off the top of your front sight' your eyes have to be wide open, and your attention singularly focused between your point-of-aim and the 'rhythm' of the gun. Fast accurate pistol shooting is as much about vision as it is about managing your own proprioceptive reflexes. (That 'muzzle bounce' has to be precisely preconditioned into your habitual reflexes.)

    You can't go into a CQB pistol gunfight and expect to do well if your attention is divided between hitting the target, on the one hand, and avoiding injury to innocent bystanders, on the other. Life just doesn't work like that! If you need an example then look at those two NYPD officers who got into a gunfight at the Empire State Building a few years ago: Criminy, those two officers had bullet holes in places like second floor windows and bystanders ACROSS the street! (How do you do that?)

    By comparison the well-known Chuck Taylor once told a story about a government operative (probably him) who had to engage two machine gun wielding thugs, right in the middle of a crowded ballroom at the (as I recall?) British Embassy in Manila. This 'G-man' had no safe lines-of-fire; the two bad guys had managed to slip into the middle of the crowd before revealing their machine guns, and there were only a few seconds left in which to engage them! So, what did this bodyguard do? He went down onto the floor right in front of these two assassins, and before they could start firing he got off two quick shots, up into the ceiling. Somewhat remarkably, on the way to the ceiling, his two shots passed from chin to cranium straight through each of the bad guys' skulls! No one else was hurt that night, and the mess on the ballroom floor was quickly cleaned up so that the party could continue!
    ‘L‘Enfer C’est Les Autres, Et Les Choses Terribles Qu’ils Font!’

    Comment


    • #3
      Hey Smurf,
      Human reaction time is around .25 of a second, so that's how we measure time in a gun fight. A good first shot time from the holster would be around 4 reaction times, or around 1 second. Once the first shot breaks follow up shots can be delivered in the .10s. In order to achieve this a lot of factors have to come together, stance, grip, trigger prep, recoil management, acceptable sight picture and trigger control. Shooting with both eyes open is also a necessity because in a high stress situation both your eyes will be open.
      My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

      Comment


      • #4
        Splits are not a constant. Splits are dependent on distance vs. size of the target and how long it takes you to see what you need to see to make the shot (relationship of perceived size of target to size of the sights). That’s how fast you will be able to shoot effectively.
        My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

        Comment

        Working...
        X