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To compete or not to compete

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  • To compete or not to compete

    I have been meaning to address this for some time and figure this is as good a medium as any. I watch entirely too many people make excuses to not try a competition because they feel their gear is not "good enough" to be competitive. I will tell you a huge secret that will save you a lot of heartache and let down..... you won't be competitive regardless of what gear you have when you begin. Too many people wait to get all of the high speed gear they feel they need, or watch others use and never actually start shooting. I you are constantly waiting for the next "new thing", you will always be waiting as there seems to be an endless stream of new gear every year. The guys who are competing at the top lever are up there because they shoot and compete and get better. The gear may give them a 1 point benefit on a certain stage but you will watch the same 10-15 people be in the top at most matches in just about any discipline. Don't let the gear race keep you from getting better and getting out there. Learn the ropes, figure out what you have that works and what you should improve and in what order. You may find where your gear actually needs improvement with how you use it instead of how others do. If you have the minimum required equipment get out there and have a great time, learn some things and get better. In the end that is what its all about. In the PRS arena I watch a top lever shooter with a 308 and a rear bag place above 100 shooters with every hot rod caliber and gadget on the market because they know their gear and know how to use it.

    thoughts?

  • #2
    💯

    Dead on with this. Having good gear is great, but if you don’t have the skill set to use it then it may not be the right gear for you when you eventually do have the skill set to use it. Now you’re buying stuff again. I’m not discouraging buying nice stuff if you have the means, but don’t let that be the factor that keeps you from competing.
    My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

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    • #3
      I’m new to the competitive shooting world. I started last year and competed in 7 local USPSA matches. I use a off the shelf M&P, gcode holster and plain mag holders. Would Gucci gear make me better or faster? Probably but improving my skill set will make the most difference at this point in the hobby. I think high end gear is what you do to fine tune your shooting once you have mastered skill set. Just my 2 cents.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Gravitytester View Post
        I’m new to the competitive shooting world. I started last year and competed in 7 local USPSA matches. I use a off the shelf M&P, gcode holster and plain mag holders. Would Gucci gear make me better or faster? Probably but improving my skill set will make the most difference at this point in the hobby. I think high end gear is what you do to fine tune your shooting once you have mastered skill set. Just my 2 cents.
        I agree. I think the latest/greatest gear and equipment will help those who already have solid shooting skills the most.

        However, to be competitive, the vast majority need to upgrade their equipment, etc.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Gravitytester View Post
          I’m new to the competitive shooting world. I started last year and competed in 7 local USPSA matches. I use a off the shelf M&P, gcode holster and plain mag holders. Would Gucci gear make me better or faster? Probably but improving my skill set will make the most difference at this point in the hobby. I think high end gear is what you do to fine tune your shooting once you have mastered skill set. Just my 2 cents.
          Are running fiber optic sights? That's the only mod I would do for the firearm to begin with. As far as gear just get a good belt and better mag pouches (double alpha is what I use). That will suit you well for a long time.

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          • #6
            I'd absolutely agree with you here. I started with what I had... a Springfield XD .40 with the stock holster and mag pouches it came with (cringeworthy, I know). I quickly ditched that for an M&P and 6 or evening 7 years later made the plunge into the 2011 market (quite an upgrade). That being said, most of the top guys would still finish at the top if you handed them a stock Sig or Glock.

            The top 4 upgrades you can do starting out would be:
            1. Fiber optic front sight and an adjustable all black rear sight.
            2. Good belt setup (quality holster, mag pouches, and inner/outer belt to hold them).
            3. Mag extensions/basepads, although the Sigs now have 21rd mags from the factory and Magpul is making cheap 21rd mags for Glock.
            4. Trigger work, whether that's an upgraded trigger system or even just polishing everything in the current gun you have. Better triggers help tremendously.

            Feel free to hit me up anytime if you have questions on gear.
            My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

            Comment


            • #7
              Shot my very first pistol match with a bone stock Glock 21 in a Galco Fletch thumbsnap holster and matching mag pouches. I ended up winning that match which is what started my competition addiction, I became highly motivated to master my EDC gear in matches as I figured that is what I would have on the street. Ultimately I made the switch to running Glock 19's in competition as the ammo was cheaper and I acquired my first 19 in '93. I made GM in Production with a bonestock G19 and Meprolight night sights and running edc style kydex holsters and pouches. I would agree on NOT spending a ton of money on gear to start but invest that money in training and ammunition.

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