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required gear versus "nice to have"

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  • required gear versus "nice to have"

    PRS lately gives people an insane expectation that they cannot enjoy long range shooting unless they have a truck bed full of equipment. While it is a pricey sport to get into, it can be done for much cheaper than people seem to think. That being said, if you have dabbled a bit and know that you enjoy it and are now looking into getting into your own gear, there are things I would push people to spend money on initially and somethings I would say wait and upgrade as needed.

    Required gear:
    Rifle: Buy something basic to begin in either .308 or 6.5/6 creed. There is plenty of factory ammunition available so you do not have to reload to have a consistent setup. Buy something with aftermarket support. Buying a R700 or a Tikka t3 on the lower level will allow you to upgrade stock, trigger, etc as you find what you like. Buying a big expensive rifle initially is fine if you have the money but you may find a stock or chassis that fits your better down the road and you will have shelled out money for something you now have to replace.

    Scope: This is where I suggest people spend their money. I would rather see a 500 dollar rifle with a 2500 dollar scope than a 5000 dollar rifle with a 500 dollar scope. You cannot shoot what you cannot see. Do your research and buy as good a scope as you can afford that fits your distance and use requirement. Just because you may do some hunting, don't shy away from the "Christmas tree" type reticles as it isn't necessarily a bad thing to have more information. A duplex reticle is for your grandfather, use the technology available to you.

    Scope level: this is required as you don't realize the effect it has on your shots at extended distance until someone shows you. Its cheap just get one and learn how to mount it.

    Bipod: Don't go cheap imitation knock off and then be pissed when it breaks. Yes I know Atlas or Harris, etc can be expensive when compared to the Ebay special that is "just as good" or the "same thing".... no it is not.

    Kestrel/weather meter: if you have the means I would say go ballistic calculator version right away as it will essentially work for the foreseeable future if you get sticker shock than you can do it the old fashioned way. Kestrel makes versions that are fairly inexpensive and can give you the information you can then use to put into your phone ballistic program to get you by.

    Ballistic program: if you get a ballistic kestrel or similar item you can check two boxes with one. there are plenty of inexpensive options though now for your smart phone and some are free. If you have your atmospherics you can use these to get very reliable firing solutions.

    Tool kit: there are plenty of good companies that make them. Fix it sticks is one that I like that gives you a pocket tool box made for weapons and trust me once you start really shooting you'll realize how often you'll use it.

    Rear bag: buy a good rear bag. You will find many uses for it as you get into the sport. Most shooting "problems" can be solved with a single bag. Something like the mini-game changer from Armageddon gear will be money well spent.

    Sling: Another tool you will find many uses for. Buy a good adjustable precision rifle sling. Leather can work but something like a TAB gear or Armageddon gear sling can be used many more ways than you know starting out.

    Good ammo: Buy good factory match ammunition. It should go without saying but I've seen people be pissed when their ball ammo doesn't shoot well out of their precision rifle.... well duh.

    do you have that?.... ok go shoot a barrel out. Go shoot some matches and figure things out. Don't let the people dragging a wagon full of gear behind them intimidate you into not starting. As you shoot and learn you'll find what niceties you want and can add slowly.

  • #2
    I completely agree with all of that. One thing I think is overlooked is a good LRF. From the entry level plain range finder to the advanced bluetooth LRF'S that link to your BC's. I really like the Bino/LRF combos for two reasons. Reduction of duplicity and you can see what you are ranging, getting quicker and more accurate results. I really like the ones from Bushnell (because they have never failed me)
    My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Steiny View Post
      I completely agree with all of that. One thing I think is overlooked is a good LRF. From the entry level plain range finder to the advanced bluetooth LRF'S that link to your BC's. I really like the Bino/LRF combos for two reasons. Reduction of duplicity and you can see what you are ranging, getting quicker and more accurate results. I really like the ones from Bushnell (because they have never failed me)
      agreed, I have a terrapin and a vortex

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      • #4
        Required:

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AVRDefense View Post
          Required:
          you need a scope level and you are set. What caliber you running?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BruiserInd View Post

            you need a scope level and you are set. What caliber you running?
            Yep! And a muzzle device!

            I put both on soon after this photo was taken. Muzzle device went on last night.

            6.5 creed

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