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What's Your Favorite Blade?

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  • What's Your Favorite Blade?

    Mine is a Randall-Made Model #14 that's otherwise known as 'The Vietnam Knife'. (Yes, there are several different knives that share this same name; but this one is my own choice.) I hemmed and hawed before buying it, not just because of the high price—which was way more than a Glock—but because it wasn't made of forged Damascus which, back in those days (the 1970's), was the 'cat's behind' of custom-made knife steels. Heck, maybe it still is!

    So, one of the guys I was hanging around with back then said to me, "Hey, Ace, what's your problem?" "More than likely that Randall will outlive you!" And do you know what! Unless I lose it or something, nowadays, I think that's exactly what's going to eventually happen!

    Anyway, it's a great knife; it really is, and I'm glad to have owned it all of these many years. I also own it's 'little brother', a Randall-Made Model #10. (The innocuous sounding 'Saltwater Fisherman' that, with a five inch blade, can be effectively employed as a useful little sleeve knife.) Here they are,



    ‘L‘Enfer C’est Les Autres, Et Les Choses Terribles Qu’ils Font!’

  • #2
    Personally, when it comes to blades, I'm not that particular about what blade I use or carry as long as it's a quality brand.

    For over 20 years, I've been carrying the same Benchmade folding knife (I don't even know the model) I got as a present for introducing a noted BJJ/MMA/knife fighting instructor in the U.S. to the knife fighting grandmasters in the Philippines. As an everyday utility knife, it has been great and even now, the blade is sharp.

    As for a fixed, combat blade, for EDC I currently have and like the Rat from Headhunter Blades.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	rat.jpg Views:	0 Size:	43.2 KB ID:	501

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    • #3
      I have an little swiss army knife and an Atienza Edc 3 with me everyday.

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      • #4
        I have about 7-8 folders (mostly Emerson with a microtech, Chris Reeves, and a Jake Hoback) I rotate through but fixed blades I've got a Ban Tang mini-bowie and a Kiku small fixed blade I carry as well depending. I've got about 6-10 smaller fixed blades and so many makers are making similar designs these days it comes down to preference and the style you prefer.

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        • #5
          My EDC changes up but currently Im carrying a Benchmade Mini-Auto. Ive had it for over a decade and it has never failed me. They were issued to us as a "Jump Master Knife" so we could access it and employ it with one hand if required (well that's how they wrote the justification for the purchase anyway....lol). For fixed blades I really really really like Dan Peters custom knives. https://danpeterscustomknives.com

          I met Dan in the Army Marksmanship Unit on the Service Rifle Team. He started out making them in his garage and that has turned into a full time business, despite still being on Active Duty. He uses some incredible steel that I can't even begin to speak intelligently about so I will leave it at this: When he was developing the "Angry Ginger", I saw him chop a split fence post in half, then stabbed it through an ammo can, followed by a car door and was still sharp enough to easily cut you. Check out his site if you have a chance. His "Stingers" are really cool key chain knives.
          My posts are for general educational and informational purposes only. What you do with this information is your responsibility. I encourage you to seek out professional instruction. Nothing replaces in-person training with a qualified professional to ensure you learn properly and train safely.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Steiny View Post
            . . . For fixed blades I really really really like Dan Peters custom knives.

            https://danpeterscustomknives.com

            I met Dan in the Army Marksmanship Unit on the Service Rifle Team. He started out making them in his garage and that has turned into a full time business, despite still being on Active Duty. He uses some incredible steel that I can't even begin to speak intelligently about so I will leave it at this: When he was developing the "Angry Ginger", I saw him chop a split fence post in half, then stabbed it through an ammo can, followed by a car door and was still sharp enough to easily cut you. Check out his site if you have a chance. His "Stingers" are really cool key chain knives.
            I really do have to agree with you! As far as I'm concerned, the cutting and slashing ability of the ancient (2,500 + year old) Greek kopis has never been either exceeded or effectively improved upon. Alexander's troops conquered the then-known world wielding kopis blades! Of all the up to 20" and shorter blade designs I've ever tried nothing has ever cut deeper or better—on a single stroke—than the concave edge of the kopis design.



            I've also long held the opinion that Indian kukri knives came about after the early Indians discovered the effectiveness of this particular cutting edge by having to face Alexander's troops in battle. To my mind 'kopis', and 'kukri' have always seemed to be oddly similar words for the exact same type of weight-forward concave blade. (I don't know? Maybe it's just a coincidence, but I continue to think there's some sort of similarity going on there.)



            "Angry Ginger", huh—I'd like to hear the story of how this knife got its name!)
            ‘L‘Enfer C’est Les Autres, Et Les Choses Terribles Qu’ils Font!’

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